7 Kinds of Tweets You Need to Send Out Daily

tweet *

While doing blogger outreach and relations for clients I often have to explain what it is and what it entails. The most important thing is the value proposition I said last time. On the other hand you need a foundation you can contact people from in the first place.

Contacting complete strangers is much more difficult than reaching out to people you have interacted with already or who already remember and like you.

Usually I take a blog for granted but many businesses do not have one or they have a blog but it’s in such a bad shape that it is rather ostracizing visitors. So you need at least to establish some kind of audience on at least one channel. Today I’d like to focus on Twitter but to a large extent these insights can be useful on other sites as well.

Ideally an outreach campaign does not start with cold mailing but is just the logical extension of prior encounters.

The best tool to create familiarity with people you can’t meet in real life but you like and who can be beneficial for you in the future is of course Twitter. You should always take a perspective of mutual aid . How can you help people you want to help you? Remember that social media is like real life, it’s give and take, giving being first.

Without a sufficient online presence you can’t give and reach out properly.

Sending a mail without prior connection should be the exception. Writing a blog post or at least a tweet and addressing a person first is a good start. You can’t talk at people out of the blue like spammers do. You have to provide value on an ongoing basis writing different posts or Twitter messages.

Now I present you the 7 kinds of tweets you need to send out daily to create a stable Twitter presence you can start to reach out from.

 

1. The retweet of your peers and potential supporters, example:

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Rishi Lakhani ‏@rishil

How to buy excellent SEO services on Get a Freelancer and Fiverr : DONT. Simple.

Retweeted by Tad Chef

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2. The self researched valuable tweet of a source not everybody reads anyway, example:

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7 Ways to Organize Your #Content for #Curation http://bit.ly/OZ8796

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3. The question and/or crowdsourcing tweet asking for support, example:

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Can I say I “pursue blogging” or “pursue blogs” or does this sound strange in English? In German you tend to say simple things complicated.

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4. The reply to one of your followers/followees tweet offering your advice/insights, example:

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@malcolmcoles The acronym SEO has been used for the first time in 1997 by Adam @Audette

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5. The group conversation tweet addressing more than one person, example:

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@fantomaster @bathbusinessweb @pedrodasilvauk Thanks for the feedback guys. The context is “I pursue blogs for German clients as well.”

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6. The emotional outcry message seeking like-minded individuals to back you, example:

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I love it. I work on a great content piece for 4 weeks and it’s done and then the blog editors decide to fix it and make it worthless. #fail

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7. The I’m doing something I’d recommend to you as well update, example:

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A big disturbance in the force! Open Site Explorer is down. http://Ahrefs.com is your friend.

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Of course there are many more ways to connect with people on Twitter and beyond. You don’t have to use templates or something. It has to work naturally. I’ve explained in the past that Twitter is like a huge party where millions of people engage in small talk.

  • Be friendly
  • be entertaining
  • be helpful

to attract similar people. Engagement is not about self promotion or monologue sending out your self-centered messages all the time.

To prepare for an outreach campaign you ideally interact on Twitter with the people you want to contact one day.

Of course it’s not like you retweet them and half an hour later you send the mail saying “I’m the guy who retweet you, please help me!”. It’s more like chatting at the Twitter party and reaching out a few days later. Self-promotional tweet are not a good foundation to get people to react to your outreach efforts. So keep them at bay.

 

*Creative Commons image by Dani_vr

 

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